Health News

June 06, 2019

Health Screenings for Men

We often think of regular maintenance for our cars and homes, but for some reason, we tend to wait until we are sick to see a doctor. Unfortunately, the “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” mentality does not work well when it comes to overall health. 


General Preventive Visit and Check Up


Physicians advise men, even those who feel well, to get a preventive check-up every one to three years depending on their age. This visit is much more than a physical exam and (a) will include an assessment of your risk factors for developing medical conditions in the future, (b) screening procedures and tests based on your age and risk factors, preventive services such as vaccinations, and counseling to help you stay well.  


It begins with a thorough review of your medical history, allergies, medication, family history, and habits.  They may ask questions about your mental health and about some of your health habits such as exercise, diet, alcohol, and tobacco use. As part of the exam, the provider will check blood pressure, height, weight and BMI (body mass index) to evaluate your risk for hypertension and heart disease.  Additionally, your provider will examine different parts of your body to make sure there are no abnormal findings. This may include listening to your heart and lungs, pushing on your abdomen, looking at your skin and even looking at your eyes, ears and throat. Your provider will probably order blood tests to check your cholesterol levels and screen for diabetes.  In addition, based on your age, risk factors, and exam finding, additional tests may be ordered to or evaluate kidney function, thyroid dysfunction, or sexually transmitted diseases before symptoms occur.


Vaccinations


Even healthy men (and women) need to get their tetanus booster every 10 years to prevent lockjaw. If you can’t remember the last time you had a tetanus shot, it might be time to get another one. Current tetanus shots include a pertussis vaccination which helps reduce the rate of whooping cough, a highly contagious respiratory tract infection that is very dangerous to babies.


To schedule a physical exam with a Primary Care Provider—Family Medicine or Internal Medicine—visit www.smgarizona.com.

 

Recommended Health Screenings for Men by Age*:

Screening Test

Ages 18-39

Ages 40-49

Ages 50-64

Ages 65 and older

Blood pressure

X

X

X

X

Diabetes

 

X

X

X

Lipid Disorders (Cholesterol)

(35 and older)

 

X

X

X

Colorectal Cancer

 

 

X

X

Hearing Exam

 

 

X

X

Vaccinations (19-49)

  • Shingles
  • Pneumococcal
  • Flu (every year starting at 6 months of age)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

X

X

HIV (15 to 65) at least once

X

X

X

X

*Recommendations made by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Age screenings may vary according to family history and individual risk factors.